• Museum of Stones, the latest novel by Lynn Lurie is out Early 2019
Museum of Stones

Praise & Reviews for Museum of Stones

"Parenthood has its many nightmares—a sizable genre of which could be labelled 'The Inadequacy of One's Love.' Lynn Lurie's Museum of Stones is a devastating and beautiful collage of such nightmarish scenes, broken shards layered to accurately reflect decades of heartbreaking and terrifying tableaux, now muffled (yet terrorizing still) in the cotton of memory. And yet what thin, sweet ray does shoot through is that the love, indeed, was human-sized and enough."

~ Eugene Lim, author of Dear Cyborgs, Fog & Car, and The Strangers.

"Lynn Lurie writes here with precision, power, and clarity about all that is most important—those things that sizzle and shriek, burn, and roar in the tunnels and caverns of the heart. Museum of Stones is a beautiful book and Lurie a marvelous writer."

~ Laird Hunt, author of Neverhome and The Evening Road.

"The radiance of Lynn Lurie's vision emanates from the devastating frisson between the fragility of the body and the futility of love to spare us the desolating solitude of grief. In Museum of Stones, the enormity of the speaker's loss pulses through each piercing iteration of her child's story. Yet writing itself is hope, attention a kind of prayer, an insistence on life, testimony to the desire to recover the shreds and shards of memory, to make from them a space where all things at once are and ever shall be possible."

~ Melanie Rae Thon, author of Author of Silence and Song

"At the center of Museum of Stones exists the nameless narrator's son, whose frail presence helps weave together memory, hurt, hope, and the grim realization that in the end we're all made of holes, not wholes. Lurie's novel is at once a beautifully condensed, understated, brave, risky associative lyric, a passionate and compassionate meditation, and a gorgeous elegy about the temporal rubble of us."

~ Lance Olsen, author of Dreamlives of Debris

"Museum of Stones is a dreamy, haunting, clamorous book by one of the bravest souls anywhere."

~ Noy Holland, author of I WAS TRYING TO DESCRIBE WHAT IT FEELS LIKE

"Museum of Stones has the scope of a novel, the concision of a novella, and the speed and movement of a prose poem. Remote, but intimate; terribly poignant, yet remorselessly unsentimental. It creates and sustains a compact with the reader… the structure unfolds to reveal new thought and language. Museum of Stones is a tour de force."

~ Philip Brady

Review for Museum of Stones:
"Parenthood has its many nightmares—a sizable genre of which could be labelled 'The Inadequacy of One's Love.' Lynn Lurie's Museum of Stones is a devastating and beautiful collage of such nightmarish scenes, broken shards layered to accurately reflect decades of heartbreaking and terrifying tableaux, now muffled (yet terrorizing still) in the cotton of memory. And yet what thin, sweet ray does shoot through is that the love, indeed, was human-sized and enough." - Eugene Lim, author of Dear Cyborgs, Fog & Car, and The Strangers.

Review for Museum of Stones:
"Lynn Lurie writes here with precision, power, and clarity about all that is most important—those things that sizzle and shriek, burn, and roar in the tunnels and caverns of the heart. Museum of Stones is a beautiful book and Lurie a marvelous writer." - Laird Hunt, author of Neverhome and The Evening Road.

Review for Museum of Stones:
"The radiance of Lynn Lurie's vision emanates from the devastating frisson between the fragility of the body and the futility of love to spare us the desolating solitude of grief. In Museum of Stones, the enormity of the speaker's loss pulses through each piercing iteration of her child's story. Yet writing itself is hope, attention a kind of prayer, an insistence on life, testimony to the desire to recover the shreds and shards of memory, to make from them a space where all things at once are and ever shall be possible." -Melanie Rae Thon, author of Author of Silence and Song

Review for Museum of Stones:
"At the center of Museum of Stones exists the nameless narrator's son, whose frail presence helps weave together memory, hurt, hope, and the grim realization that in the end we're all made of holes, not wholes. Lurie's novel is at once a beautifully condensed, understated, brave, risky associative lyric, a passionate and compassionate meditation, and a gorgeous elegy about the temporal rubble of us." -Lance Olsen, author of Dreamlives of Debris

Review for Museum of Stones:
"Museum of Stones is a dreamy, haunting, clamorous book by one of the bravest souls anywhere."
-Noy Holland, author of I WAS TRYING TO DESCRIBE WHAT IT FEELS LIKE